From the Field StaffBVA Training Coordinator Wade Davis

By Wade Davis

How to Become a Volunteer National Service Officer


You served in our Nation’s Armed Forces and now you can serve our blinded veterans and their families as we “Stand Together.”

Becoming a Volunteer National Service Officer can be one of the most rewarding things you will ever do in your life. Helping newly blinded veterans turn their lives around by encouraging attendance at a VA Blind Rehab Center, assisting them so that they receive the VA benefits they have earned, helping a spouse obtain Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) benefits, or walking through the grieving process of losing a loved one are just a few of the many things you will be privileged to do.

This exciting career will add enormous fulfillment to your life. If you are ready to start this amazing journey, the requirements to become a Volunteer National Service Officer are included below.

Anyone wishing to become a Volunteer National Service Officer must comply with 38 CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) 14.626 and be a BVA member or Auxiliary member in good standing.

The Volunteer National Service Officer must successfully complete a training course and examination approved by the Office of General Counsel. BVA accepts the National Veterans Legal Services Program (NVLSP) basic training course and certification to meet the initial requirements. The NVLSP training and exam is an online course and can be found at 
http://www.nvlsp.org/store/the-basic-training-course-for-veterans-benefits

VA requires no fewer than 1,000 work hours annually to continue accreditation as a Volunteer National Service Officer. This is broken down to a minimum of 20 hours per week. BVA prohibits any Volunteer National Service Officer from conducting claims work from home. The duty station is an office in a VA Medical Center or a VBA Regional Office.

The Volunteer National Service Officer reports directly to the National Field Service Officer in his/her respective region. A copy of all claims submitted and hours worked shall be submitted in an end-of-month report to the National Field Service Officer.

The Volunteer National Service Officer will be subject to an ongoing review by the supervising National Field Service Officer, the National Field Service Training Coordinator, and the National Director of the Field Service Program. This review is to ensure that the Volunteer National Service Officer meets all VA requirements of accreditation. If it is determined at any time that the Volunteer National Service Officer is not maintaining 1,000 hours annually or is not demonstrating an adequate ability to represent claimants before VA, his/her accreditation is revoked.

The staff of the BVA Field Service Program welcomes our Association members and members of BVAA to stand together with us and take advantage of this incredible opportunity. The sensational journey of the Volunteer National Service Officer awaits you. For further information, contact fieldservice@bva.org.