Of Note

 

Vision Researchers Earn Teague Award

 

Left to right, Tom Miller, VA Director of Blind Rehabilitation Gale Watson, Dr. Glenn Cockerham, and Dr. Greg Goodrich at Teague Awards Ceremony.
Left to right, Tom Miller, VA Director of Blind Rehabilitation Gale Watson, Dr. Glenn Cockerham, and Dr. Greg Goodrich at Teague Awards Ceremony.

Glenn C. Cockerham, M.D. and Gregory L. Goodrich, Ph.D. of the VA Palo Alto Health Care System received the 2009 Olin E. Teague Award at a September 17 reception on Capitol Hill.

The awards program, now in its 29th year, recognizes excellence in the rehabilitation and improvement in quality of life of war-injured veterans. The award is especially significant to BVA this year due to the honorees’ work with the Research and Clinical Care for Traumatic Brain Injury and Related Issues Team in Palo Alto.

Established by VA, the award memorializes the late Honorable Olin E. Teague, a former Chairman of the House Committee on Veterans Affairs whose commitment and dedication were instrumental to the Department’s mission.

Dr. Cockerham and Dr. Goodrich each received a plaque engraved with Secretary Shinseki’s signature, a shadow box with Teague’s bust engraved inside, a flag that had been flown over the Capitol, a courtesy call with the Secretary, and a White House letter signed by President Obama.

“The findings we have made and the work we have been able to accomplish would not be possible without BVA’s continuous advocacy to get us the resources and support we have needed over the years,” Cockerham told Tom Miller following the ceremony. “We thank you for being there for us so that this type of recognition is possible.”

Migel Library to Move to APH

 

The M.C. Migel Memorial Library of the American Foundation for the Blind, one of the world’s most significant research collections on the non-medical issues surrounding blindness and visual impairment, will move to the American Printing House for the Blind.

Date of the transition has not yet been announced. The move will take contents of the library from New York City to Louisville, Kentucky.

“We selected APH to house the Migel Library because it is a repository of knowledge and is committed to preserving and expanding its book collection,” said AFB President and CEO Carl Augusto. “With APH’s popular annual meeting and its connection to a number of university prep programs, we are confident that these important books will continue to educate people in our field for years to come.”

The 75-year-old Migel collection contains items on aging, orientation and mobility, education, employment, and rehabilitation. It also includes a collection of items relating to deaf-blindness, fictional titles that feature blind or visually impaired characters, books on Helen Keller, children’s books about blindness and visual impairment, and other AFB publications dating back to the 1920s.